From Fiber to Sweater Pt. II

I am very happy to announce that, as of this week, I was able to finish my first sweater made from hand spun wool that I spun as I knit.  As with the nature of being a beginner spinner, it took me a couple boobins worth of navajo ply to really get a good consistancy, and even then, my yarn became bulkier the closer to the end.  

Problems that came from being a beginner spinner:

1. I found that my gauge when knitting was changing while spinning as I went.

Snoquamile Cardigan

Snoquamile Cardigan

2. My sweater came out very dense in parts and would not air dry

Snoqualmie Cardigan

Snoqualmie Cardigan

3. Because of the gauging issue, the armseye in my sweater came out a bit big. But, I am going to roll with it for now as it has a ton of ease to allow for lots of layering.

Snoqualmie Cardigan : better look at my sleeve issue

Snoqualmie Cardigan : better look at my sleeve issue

Qualities I loved about the hand spun targee:

1. Sense of pride first and foremost in myself for learning and utilizing a new tool in my knitting arsenal. 

Snoqualmie Cardigan

Snoqualmie Cardigan

2. The characteristics of the yarn make it feel very durable and rustic in nature, like I would be on a sheep farm.

Snoqualmie Cardigan

Snoqualmie Cardigan

3. The way it felted up makes me feel like this sweater is invinsible.

Snoqualmie Cardigan

Snoqualmie Cardigan

To top it off, I was able to use handmade antler buttons from The Yarn Underground.  These perfectly encapsulated the bespoke vibe I was going for and fit in with my PNW sweater.  

Snoqualmie Cardigan : antler buttons

Snoqualmie Cardigan : antler buttons

All in all, I am very happy with the final outcome, even if it is 70+ degrees in eastern Washington today.  The Snoqualmie cardigan pattern was very simple and hade very minimal shaping. Highly suggest it! 

 

Snoqualmie Cardigan

Snoqualmie Cardigan